‘Interview with the Vampire’ fans say the stakes have never been this high

Date:

When a new AMC episode Interview with the Vampire A special kind of fuse was lit in the online discussions surrounding the show when it aired last Sunday. The fifth installment of the second season, “Don’t Be Afraid, Just Start the Tape,” was a brilliantly written and acted horror film – the kind of thing you watch with your mouth open, and then point at the TV and say, “Are you watching this too?!?!”

Yet when thousands of people took to social media to ask this very question, most comments were filled with confusion, and even concern, that people weren’t actually seeing it — that they weren’t watching Interview with the Vampire Not at all. Many said it was a crime for such a good show that more people weren’t watching and discussing it, and that more critics weren’t covering it. “This is the best show on TV right now,” New York Times culture reporter Kyle Buchanan wrote in a widely shared tweet. “I guess you all prefer talking about mediocre or bad shows instead of watching the golden standard!”

Some fans had already noticed the reduced critical coverage compared to the first season, which received near-universal praise and saw the performances of the show and its lead actors, Jacob Anderson and Sam Reid, land on several year-end best-of lists. If anything, the show’s second season received even more rave reviews, but the large-scale spectacular event coverage that other acclaimed shows often receive (and is receiving as we speak) was absent from notable mainstream outlets.

Plugged-in fans had also noticed a drop in viewership compared to the first season, at least according to publicly available metrics, and ahead of the June 9 episode, Slate published an article titled, “Interview with the Vampire It’s the best show that almost nobody is watching,” which explicitly stated those numbers. Word began to spread — particularly on up-to-the-minute platforms like X, but also places like Reddit, TikTok, and even my home base, Tumblr, which is more likely to host gifsets, shitposts, or graduate-seminar-level analysis of the show than discussions of terrestrial television ratings.

AMC announced IWTV‘s second season aired before the first, but halfway through the second season, there was no talk of a third season—and with the narrative becoming about “the best show no one is watching,” especially after an episode that many praised, fans began to worry about its fate. This mass of people, particularly on X, quickly became the focus of AMC’s marketing efforts—and fans’ accusations that the network wasn’t doing enough to promote its show created a firestorm that lasted for days. “The marketing options AMC is working with Interview with the Vampire One fan wrote, “This is suicidal.” Or, in the words of another: “I’m so angry they made me Google who the head of marketing at AMC is.”

there might be There are many reasons why a show might not get the reach it deserves in 2024; countless things have been said over the past few years about streamer fatigue and a lack of audiences. AMC, a darling of the iconic TV-on-cable era, is in a particularly awkward position: even when Interview‘s first season was a hit on its streaming service, AMC+, yet it was seen as an example of a troubled industry in transition. Two years and two Hollywood strikes later, the situation has become even more complicated. As the industry restructures and changes who can watch what, a disconnect has emerged between audience tastes and critics’ tastes. At the same time, social media platforms—the center of 21st-century word-of-mouth—continue to flounder, fragmenting an already fragmented audience conversation.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Subscribe

spot_imgspot_img

Popular

More like this
Related

10-minute delivery app Zepto raises $665 million at a $3.6 billion valuation

Zepto has raised a whopping $665 million in a...

Today’s NYT Connection Hints, Answers & Help June 21, #376

Need answers to the June 21 New York Times...

We’re still waiting for the next big leap in AI

When OpenAI announced its latest big language model, GPT-4,...